Tag Archives: Library Collections

Ethical Acquisitions?

5 Dec

Photo by Steve Rhodes

What is the difference between a public library purchasing their books through a local independent bookstore as opposed to shopping online at Amazon or buying new releases at Costco or Wal-Mart?

In general, I am a huge proponent of buying locally. Yes, most of my clothes were made in developing countries and I do buy bananas and avocados (obviously not grown locally) but I strive to uphold a certain ideal which means that given a choice I will buy “local” even if it means paying a higher cost.

This ethical obligation that I feel towards buying locally and from independent sources might come from my years of working at a small independent bookstore in Quebec City. At the time, we truly viewed Amazon as our evil competition because we felt powerless to rival their fantastic discounts that are only possible when items are purchased in large bulk quantities. Most often distributors will set the cost price of a book (aka the wholesale price) depending on the quantity that the retailer is purchasing. Therefore if my bookstore ordered 15 copies of a new bestseller, we were paying more for each copy than a large chain store who might order 500 copies and then distribute the copies amongst the different store locations. Since our initial cost of the book was higher, we already made less money on each sale making it more difficult to match online or large-store discounts. However, we provided an excellent service; our entire staff was passionate about books, customer service, and recommending the right book for the right person. We developed special relationships with our regular clients calling them by name and knowing which new books would interest certain clients.  When people would say how great Amazon was I would reply “but who do you know who works at Amazon?”. I tried to communicate to people that when purchasing something on Amazon you don’t know exactly where your money is going whereas when you buy from a local store you know that you are helping to pay the wages of the staff who greet you on the front lines.

Since I’ve been a public library director, I’ve been doing my library acquisitions of French books at Le Bouquin small independent bookstore here in Tracadie-Sheila. I know the owner personally and she is always friendly and available to respond to my questions, my requests for rushed billing, or my surprise visits to the bookstore. Unfortunately, my public library’s budget for collection development relies almost entirely on fundraising. When volunteers and staff work hard for every single dollar raised for the collection, it is normal that they expect that the money be spent in the most effective way possible.  Therefore, recently I have been questioned as to why we shouldn’t buy books from time to time at the Atlantic Superstore. Now for those of you outside the Maritimes, the Atlantic Superstores are a chain of big box grocery stores owned by Loblaws, Canada’s largest food distributor (source Wikipedia). In addition to groceries, they also offer a pharmacy, home supplies, a clothing section, and of course books, CDs and DVDs. The majority of books they sell all have a sticker boasting a 25% discount off the retail price.

Now, I love books and I am passionate about anything that gets people reading. I feel then that I must tread carefully with what I say next. Although no one that I know goes into the Superstore specifically to buy books, due to clever in-store marketing and great discounts a lot of people do end up purchasing a book as a type of impulse buy. Am I really going to complain that the store strategically places Caillou books amongst the kids’ clothing so that parents are more likely to buy books for their kids while they are shopping for clothes? No…like I said if people are buying books then I’m happy.

Now obviously the Superstore does not offer the same type of service as a bookstore. Although they always tend to have the bestselling fiction and non-fiction in stock, I cannot place orders through them, and I cannot request that they inform me when the latest title of a popular author will be released.

Also, by doing library acquisitions at the local independent bookstore, I believe strongly that I am having a more positive effect on the local economy. The people who raised money for the library’s collection are from Tracadie-Sheila and therefore I want that money to stay at the local level instead of going off to enrich the already affluent owners of the Loblaws chain.

I am very curious as to what others think about this. Is my self-righteous attitude hindering my library’s collection? If it meant being able to purchase more books with the same amount of budget would you shop at the big box store?

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Go Library Book Rate !

3 Oct

My public library system is largely dependent on the sharing of library materials through Canada Post. Our individual collection budgets are extremely small and it is thanks to Canada’s Library Book Rate that we can easily transfer materials from one library to another at the request of patrons. There is absolutely no way that our system could afford the amount of mail that we send if it were not for the Library Book Rate. Due to its importance, in the spring my Library Board members conducted a letter writing campaign to raise awareness of the fragility of this program and requested that individuals, community organizations and businesses write to the federal government to show their support for the continuation of the government subsidies provided through this program.

So, it has been with great interest that I have been following the developments in Canadian government for a commitment to the continuation of the Library Book rate program. I am therefore extremely thrilled to see that the federal government has announced its support of Bill C-509 in which the Library Book Rate will be integrated into the Canada Post’s Corporation Act as well as expand the current program to cover audio-visual material (not currently covered by the book rate program).

I encourage you to watch the video of the press conference below. I am especially impressed by the importance that the politicians give to the CLA. It makes me very proud to be a CLA member when I see the influence that their lobbying ! Go CLA and go Library Book Rate!